The Value of Influencer Marketing

The ever-changing digital landscape we live in is constantly changing the way we do business. No longer are people merely turning to their peers for recommendations, they’re looking to see what their favorite YouTuber or Insta Blogger has to say about products. This is particularly true for younger generations like Millennials and Generation Z. Thanks to social media platforms like YouTube and Instagram, regular people are now able to build their own brands by generating engaging content from the comfort of their own homes, making them that much more relatable.

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Unlike celebrities, influencers tend to be more engaging with their followers--they answer your questions, like your comments and share personal stories--in short, they come across more genuine. A 2016 study by Google shows that 70 percent of teenage YouTube audiences are influenced more by YouTubers than traditional celebrities. Influencers have become popular by showing their expertise in a particular niche, e.g., fashion, travel, makeup, etc., and thus become trusted on those specific topics. Celebrities, however, are paid to give recommendations because they have a large following due to their acting, modeling, singing, etc., making them seem less authentic when endorsing a product. Actress Blake Lively is known for her signature golden locks and has been a spokesperson for L’Oreal Paris for a couple of years now. But let’s be honest, do we really believe Blake Lively colors her hair out of a box? Probably not. However, could we believe our favorite beauty blogger does? Sure. Furthermore, 49 percent of consumers depend on influencer recommendations when making purchasing decisions.

Now, not all influencers were created equal, and it takes some time to find the right one to work with. You’ll want to make sure your target audience falls within their following, as well as ensure that their content is aligned with their messaging. Someone might have 100,000 followers, but if it’s 100,000 people who don’t care about what your selling, you’re just wasting everyone’s time and money. Not to mention if you demonstrate that you’ve done research on the influencer you’re reaching out to by explaining the synergies between their messaging and your product, they will be much more inclined to actually respond.

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It is also essential to be on the lookout for influencer marketing fraud, or people who appear to have a large following but in reality, have paid for most of their followers or are using artificial followers to make themselves seem more valuable. That said, once you find the right people, influencer marketing is a surefire way to increase conversion rates as well as be cost effective. On average, brands see an ROI of $6.85 for every dollar invested in influencer marketing.

Influencer marketing is especially unique because it is a mutually beneficial relationship. Influencers want to find brands and products to promote to their audience, and companies need people to promote them. Whether you’re an influencer yourself or are someone trying to find an influencer, understanding this new branch of marketing is key to success. And for those of you out there working to become an influencer and build up your following, check out iFluenz, an agency which specializes in all things influencer marketing.







Understanding How to Market to Different Generations

Labeling the different generations has long been an American pastime, particularly when people are trying to justify or explain specific characteristics. And while it may be fun to poke fun at Millennials and blame us for killing the napkin industry, the truth is understanding how each generation thinks has become a key component in marketing. Recently, some industry insiders have even been coining the term “generational marketing” as a way to modernize marketing strategies. By breaking down and understanding how to connect with the different audiences, you’re gaining a competitive advantage in allowing customers to feel like you know them.

Traditionalists or the Silent Generation (1945 and earlier)

The oldest living generation in the U.S. is often described as conservative, hard-working and resilient. They grew up in a time of crisis as their lives were heavily influenced by the Great Depression and both World Wars. And just like their label--they are quite traditional, meaning they’re not interested in any kind of flashy, high-tech advertising tactics. These are the people who still wake up every day and actually read the newspaper. While some would say this group has become a niche demographic, the fact is they still have purchasing power, and thus must be accounted for when strategizing marketing concepts.

Baby Boomers (1946-1964)

Also known as the “me” generations, these are the people who are slowly starting to embrace the digital age but still appreciate a good voicemail or face-to-face conversation. Although Millennials are on track to surpass Baby Boomers as the largest generation in the next few years, baby boomers continue to have the most purchasing power. They’re heading into retirement and tend to have significantly higher disposable incomes compared to Millennials, many of whom are bogged down by debt. This demographic spends the most across all product categories, yet are targeted by just five to 10 percent of marketing. If businesses took advantage of putting effort and funds into capturing this group’s attention, they would be poised to emerge as a marketing leader.


Generation X (1965-1980)

Of all of the groups, Gen X is continually the hardest to categorize. Sandwiched between two larger generations that are vastly different from one another, millennials and baby boomers, Gen Xers can often be overlooked. In a 2010 survey, Pew Research asked adults of all ages if they thought their own generation was unique, about six in 10 Boomers and Millennials said yes, while only approximately half of Gen Xers said the same. They aren’t worried about themselves, or what makes them special, they’re concerned about their young children and securing their futures. For this reason, marketing targeted toward Gen X should be less about them and their needs or wants, and more about promoting stable family life.


Millennials (1981-1995)

Ah yes, the “special snowflakes” that everyone else seems to love to hate so much. Millennials are known for having a sense of entitlement, something instilled in us by our Baby Boomer parents and a lifetime’s supply of participation trophies. Bad reputation aside, we’re also an emerging opportunity for marketers that businesses can’t afford to ignore. Millennials possess a collective $600 billion in purchasing power each year, a number that is expected to grow into the trillions by 2020. We are also motivated by recommendations from family and friends and attracted to easy shopping, i.e., online shopping. When making a purchasing decision, we look to reviews from other customers and will do anything for free shipping. All advertising and marketing campaigns should also always be optimized for mobile viewing as 52 percent of Millennials use smartphones for shopping and browsing.

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Generation Z (1996 and later)

Millennials may be very tech savvy, but it’s nothing compared to this digital generation. They were born into an age where they cannot even imagine life without a cell phone, let alone without Wi-Fi. The most socially conscious and diverse generation, they also are more inclined to interact with companies they believe in. With Snapchat, Instagram, and Twitter quite literally at their fingertips, they will be quick to judge a company’s authenticity based on their social media presence. They have an average "eight-second filter" to gauge whether something is worth their attention. The youngest generation also tends to gravitate toward getting information quickly without having to actually speak to anyone, think short explainer videos and social media campaigns.


At the end of the day, it’s important to remember that not all marketing is created equally and what may resonate with one person could offend another. But the best way to combat this is to understand the different demographics and make educated decisions in your marketing campaigns. At EMB, we work with each client individually to come up with a custom marketing strategy tailored to their target audience.






Branding At Its Finest—Cult Brand: REI

November is upon us and Thanksgiving is right around the corner, which also means Black Friday is fast approaching. Over the last couple of decades, Black Friday has traditionally become the busiest shopping day in the U.S.--last year, shoppers reportedly spent a combined $1 million per minute between online and in-store purchases. Most stores have already been gearing up for the big day and have employees braced for the long shifts and chaotic crowds, however, one well-known retailer does just the opposite: they close their stores.

Recreational Equipment, Inc., better known as REI, actually shuts down all 154 of their stores, halts online orders and pays their employees to instead, #OptOutside. The initiative began in 2015 as a way to urge both customers and employees to spend the day outside enjoying nature with loved ones as opposed to joining the masses on the hunt for sales. REI was the first major retailer to do this, and although many companies gawked at their seeming stupidity, customers praised them. Even without Black Friday sales, REI continues to be a thriving outdoor and sporting goods retailer with a customer base now more loyal than ever.

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REI began in 1955 as a small co-operative in Seattle selling equipment geared toward serious climbers and mountaineers. In fact, REI’s first ever full-time employee and later CEO was Jim Whittaker, the first American to ever summit Mount Everest. The company continued to market to only these serious athletes until the 1980’s when they shifted toward a more family-friendly offering and began supplies for camping, cycling, kayaking, and other less extreme outdoor sports. However, at its core, REI has always remained true to its customer: the outdoorsman. REI’s products are meant to be enjoyed and put to use outdoors, so they invited everyone to join them in doing so and #OptOutside. The campaign earned 6.7 billion media impressions and 1.2 billion social impressions. Social media mentions rose 7,000 percent in only 24 hours. Instantly, everyone was talking about REI, and now more enthused to support them than ever.

REI fosters a feeling of community among both their customers and employees that is inclusive to everyone. Their entire brand identity revolves around the phrase “an outdoor life is a life well lived.” It doesn’t matter your social status, gender, religion, age, political beliefs; if you’re an outdoor enthusiast, then you belong. REI doesn’t just symbolize a retailer, it’s an experience. And more and more, studies are showing that people would rather pay for experiences over material items. REI encourages all of its customers to tag them on Instagram when sharing memories from their adventures. The company listened to their customers and recognized most of them would rather spend time outside than shopping, and thus the #OptOutside campaign was born. Unlike their competitors, REI has built personal relationships with consumers by demonstrating they care about their well being. Customers know they can trust REI and its employees for advice on not only which walking sticks to buy, but also which hiking trail to take. Additionally, their site offers a section on expert advice with hundreds of articles ranging from how to hike with your dog to treating blisters.

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For the fourth consecutive year, REI will yet again #OptOutside this Black Friday, now joined by hundreds of other retailers who followed the trend. Each year, REI sees an uptick in the number of members who join after Black Friday, now encouraged to join after witnessing firsthand the company’s generosity toward its employees and legitimate understanding of its customers. At the end of the day, if there’s one thing REI has an expert grasp on, it’s customer care. Their marketing strategy is something that inspires our team at EMB, and it is most definitely something we strive to emulate.





Am I Budgeting Enough for Marketing in 2019?

We don’t know about y’all, but here at EMB we can’t believe it’s already almost November! Where did 2018 go? As the year comes to an end, many relax, but the wise prepare for the year to come. If you are interested in the continuous upward growth of your brand, then you are most likely planning out your marketing budget for 2019, though if you have not done so yet, no need to fret. This blog post will not only help you begin the brainstorming process, but also force you to answer some challenging self-evaluating questions.

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Where are Other Companies Spending Their Marketing Budget?

There are a few key concerns when gauging where you should allocate more or less money into your marketing budget, the first being what are other companies spending their marketing budgets on? Which form of marketing is the most popular and yields the most significant reaction from my targeted audience? According to Forbes, we should expect to see more money being spent on influencer marketing and content marketing to help continue to build relationships and add value to them in 2019. This assertion correlates well when read in conjunction with articles that provide data displaying that 82 percent of businesses will increase their digital marketing budget by 50 percent.

Simply put, companies are spending more of their marketing budget on digital marketing as opposed to paper and print marketing, and more specifically, budgeting for more visual content with fewer words. The trend is to follow the traits of the audience, 85 percent of whom are watching videos on a daily basis. Specifically, how-to videos have been said to increase conversions on a webpage by as much as 80 percent.


Are My Marketing Efforts Working?

This question is a difficult one to answer if you do not necessarily know how to track your progress. One way to do it would be to look at how many sales you generate in a month compared to the amount you spend monthly on marketing. This equation may be harder to use for a business that has not quite started rolling in dollars, but still very well may be experiencing a return on their investment via the new relationships they are forming and the traffic they are generating. Other things to look out for when determining whether your marketing efforts are actually working are: lead generation, brand awareness, engagement, lead nurturing, sales, customer retention and building an audience through subscriptions. Furthermore, analyzing where your traffic is sourcing from will help you determine where the money you spend is leading people back to you the most; whether it be postcards, e-mails, videos or blog posts. Once you have an idea about the way in which people are finding you, you can then begin to focus more on those avenues in the hopes of continuously increasing traffic.

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Preparing for a new year is a necessary evil, and allows even the best of the best to take a moment to reflect on their highlights and downfalls. Fortunately, this daunting task can be made easy with the help of tools such as this free 2019 Digital Marketing Budget Calculator. With the upcoming year just on the horizon, do not be afraid to adopt the “out with the old, and in with the new” mentality. Staying on trend is the name of the game. Visit our homepage to learn more about how we at EMB can help you strategize your 2019 marketing plan.



How the Colors of Your Logo Impact Your Brand

Ordinarily, when your brand idea is in the beginning stages of creation, you may put a good amount of thought into what colors you want to bring your brand to life. Perhaps you have a favorite color or have always felt as if two or three particular colors next to each other are aesthetically pleasing. While these may be solid lines of thought, when choosing colors for your logo, the warm feelings your favorite color bring you may send the wrong message to your targeted audience. In fact, studies suggest that people make a subconscious judgment about a product within 90 seconds of initial viewing, with 90 percent of this assessment based on color alone. You may not even be aware of it, but colors are affecting your perception of a company the second you see their logo.

Before you begin to decide what colors are best for your brand, you must first make sure you are aware of a few key considerations. It is essential to think of your brand colors as one of the most cost-effective ways to make a lasting impression on your potential client. Think about it, when you see yellow and red together, most people will either immediately think of the ketchup and mustard dynamic duo or the fast food giant, McDonald’s. Equally important is jogging your brain for that color theory knowledge we all learned in grade school. Hubspot provided us with an appropriate starting point when choosing colors by explaining the primary colors, secondary colors and tertiary colors. Pick a color that you love, then from there you should refer to a color wheel to find similar and complementary shades; though it’s an essential rule of thumb to stay within monochromatic colors of the same hue. Don’t be discouraged if you do not consider yourself to be a person with an eye for color, when you follow these simple steps, you will find yourself at a phenomenal starting point!

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Aside from how to pick your colors, the actual colors you choose have an impact on the people from whom you’re hoping to earn business. Have you ever noticed that some colors can elicit emotions that others do not? You aren’t alone, this phenomenon has been studied on numerous occasions by intellectual powerhouses around the world. Red grabs your attention and evokes passion, blue portrays trustworthiness and security, black boasts sophistication and prestige; the list goes on. If you think about some of the top brands with recognizable logos, it’s not hard to understand what they were trying to portray when designing it. Green is often associated with health, serenity and prestige, so it’s no surprise Starbucks turned to it when starting their upscale coffee house. While simple, the black, grey or white partially eaten apple of Apple symbolizes luxury; it’s also worth noting black is particularly successful in selling expensive products. Pink is associated with feminine traits, so it became Barbie’s signature color to capture the attention of their intended consumers. All three of these companies made very educated decisions in their logo. When choosing a color scheme, focus on your target audience, establish what you’re trying to instill in them about your product or business, and then consider what colors will fit that description.

Colors in logos will increase brand recognition by 80 percent, but there is also a balance in understanding where to draw the line. Use too many colors and you’ll have viewers desperate to exit your landing page before they even have a chance to learn about you. A whopping 95 percent of brands use one or two colors in their logo, and graphic designers warn you should never use more than three, as an onslaught of color can stress out or confuse your audience. Experts also advise brands to usually steer clear of particularly bright shades, which can be hard on the eyes. Always start in black and white, because if it doesn’t look good in black and white, it definitely won’t look good in a bolder color. Mess around with different combinations, while blue may seem like the perfect fit in your head, it may not actually translate onto the image.

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At EMB, logo design is a crucial component of our overall marketing services plan. Our team of trained graphic designers works with you every step of the way to bring your vision to life while also offering their expertise.






Tips for Curating an Email List that will Actually Drive Results

As a brand, you want to ensure that you are consistently adding to your pool of potential clients. Email marketing specifically has become one of the No. 1 ways to sell anything online! In the competitive market we are forced to survive in, every email address or phone number can turn into a success story or a referral for the same. How have you been growing your database thus far? Listed below are a few of the most effective ways to develop a database and some of the mistakes even you may have made in the process.

The most effective way to grow a database will always be the one that works best specifically for your brand and audience. However, there are a few tried and true methods of collecting information that generally yield those positive results for which we are searching. One fresh and exciting way to gain emails is to host a giveaway! Perhaps on a social media platform or on your brand’s website itself. Create requirements that make providing your email mandatory for giveaway entry; people will then be incentivized to give over their personal information. An essential part of growing your list is providing your subscribers with a reason to want to hear from you. Virtually the most effective way to expand your email list with actual potential clients is to give them something worth sharing with their friends, family, and social networks with ease. Viral content is key!

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The biggest mistake a brand can make concerning their email list is believing there’s not a reason or need to get rid of a little clutter. People who have shown no interest in becoming a potential buyer or have had a substantial change of circumstance, for the purposes of your email list, would be considered clutter and should thus be removed. According to Hubspot, your email list degrades by 22.5 percent every year thanks to changed email addresses, or that pesky little “unsubscribe” button, making nearly a quarter of emails sent out essentially a wasted effort. One should also always be mindful of emails that are bouncing back, and apt to learn why they are bouncing back. It could be as simple as a typo in the server name, or perhaps the email address is no longer valid. It may sound counterproductive, but it is far better to have a smaller email list with better quality customers than a larger database where the majority of your emails are getting deleted, sent to junk mail, or worse, reported as spam. Keep an eye on your open rates; if someone is consistently never even opening your email, it’s probably a sign they should be scrubbed from your database. Quality over quantity, always.

Another naive move made by many people eager to grow their list is buying subscribers. Yes, there are websites where you can purchase the online address of millions of “people.” This may sound like a quick fix to some people, but the downside to this is the lack of relationship you have with these people, who are now a part of the of group clicking the “unsubscribe” link and leaving you with nothing to show for your email campaign. You also run the risk of wasting money on emails that may not even belong to real people, or worse, addresses that are misspelled or incomplete. Not to mention if you end up with too many spam reports, you’ve put yourself in the position of losing the trust of the few true subscribers with which you started.

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Going forward, put yourself in the shoes of your subscribers. Persistence can yield results, but also walks the fine line of being annoying. A million discounts may not bring you the desired amount of revenue or the quality of client you want long term. Content is not limited to discounts - send out a blog post roundup, FAQs, big news for your company or industry; there are so many possibilities, it just takes a little team brainstorming. If you’re feeling like your open rates are declining, you might even consider sending out a poll or survey asking what kind of content they enjoy receiving in email marketing campaigns. Don’t be afraid to switch up your tactics and keep your subscribers always wanting more.

Enjoy what you read? Then head here to subscribe to our email list. We guarantee consistent, quality content, and promise not to spam you! :)




Negative Online Reviews? No Problem!

You may have read this title once, and then needed to reread it a couple of times. Fortunately, your eyes do not deceive you! As a business owner, those five golden stars sparkle like those in the night sky. In the instance that you lose one of your stars due to a negative review from an unsatisfied customer, you may begin to feel inadequate or as if you have done something completely wrong and there is no coming back from it, but no need to fret! This post will provide you with a new take on negative reviews, and how you can use them to your advantage.

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Perfection Is Not Realistic

Before you make a decision on anything, whether it be where to have dinner or which facial wash will work better for your skin, you probably didn’t make your decision until you have thoroughly read online reviews. What do these online reviews do for you as a consumer? Which one do you prefer more, the reviews that you read online, or perhaps word-of-mouth reviews you receive from your trusted friends and family? Regardless, statistics show that only 42 percent of people allow their friends and family to influence their purchase, while 68 percent of consumers report that online reviews have a more significant influence on their investment.

So what exactly does this tell us about negative reviews? This means that consumers are looking closely at reviews, but not in the way that you may expect. Sure, positive reviews are great for a company, and as a business owner, you don’t want to miss out on the 72 percent of people who take action after reading a positive review. But by the same token, too many positive reviews can be seen as “fake news” to the consumer and essentially scare them away from making the commitment. A negative review can make your business seem more realistic and trustworthy. Ultimately, a negative review can give the potential consumer a look at what could go wrong and allow them the opportunity to decide if it matters to them.

You Control the Narrative

As a business owner, your perspective is highly determinable of your success in that it can be a direct indicator of how you handle stressful situations. Think of a negative review as being the common cold of consumer relations! Almost every business will review a negative report (unless they are paying for only positive ones), but not every company will address the negative review in a way that can propel their business to the next level. This is a perfect opportunity to stand out amongst you direct competitors.

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One crucial thing to decipher prior to responding to a negative comment is assessment. Remember that people are people and sometimes are just looking for something to complain about, attention, or perhaps money. Other consumers are genuinely attempting to voice their concerns and hold the brand accountable. The former is not the type of reviews you should respond to, especially if they are inappropriate or offensive. A response here may place your brand in the same light as the person who wrote the review: immature. The negative reviews of substance are worth replying to because you are then in a position to control the narrative. Let the customer know you are hearing them and care about their opinion. At EMB, we welcome all customer reviews because we want to provide the best possible service for our clients.



Branding At Its Finest—Cult Brand: Apple

It seems every time you visit the Apple website these days, there’s yet another new product/update/technology ready to be swept up by the millions of Apple users around the world. When the first iPhone premiered in 2007, it retailed starting at $499—half the price of the brand’s latest iPhone X, which ranges from $999 up to $1,149 making it the most expensive iPhone to date. Yet, they still have us lining up around the world ready and willing to fork over our hard earned cash just because there’s something newer and shinier on the conveyor belt. Today, we’ll be taking a look at how Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak took Apple from a garage and turned it into one of the most successful cult brands in the world.   

After the iPhone made its debut, it wasn’t long before competing brands released their own versions of smartphones. While the Samsung Galaxy and Google Pixel have their fair share of buyers, iPhone sales still top the charts. In 2017, 13 million iPhone 7’s were shipped around the world putting it as the #1 smartphone of the year. In a distant second was the iPhone 6 with 7.9 million units sold, and Samsung just cracked the top three spot with 7.8 million shipments of their Galaxy J2. When you break down the specs of each of the devices, they’re not all that different. In fact, there are plenty of people out there who argue the iPhone is staunchly inferior to its counterparts, but still, Apple says jump and we ask how high—or rather, how much?

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The now iconic partially eaten apple has become a symbol synonymous with luxury and self-fulfillment; and thanks to payment plans, you don’t even have to be particularly affluent to afford the latest and greatest tech accessory. Now you and celebrities can have the same phone, at the same time. Yet, when you take a look at how Apple markets, whether it be their landing page, store layouts, commercials, etc., only one word comes to mind: simplicity. They let their products speak for themselves. They don’t tell you the camera is better, they show you the camera is better by portraying ordinary people capturing extraordinary photos. Instead of telling you the phone is waterproof, they simply put it underwater. Their marketing techniques don’t make you feel like you want the new iPhone, they make you feel like you need it.

Apple has become so intertwined in the average adult’s life because they focus on creating products that will simplify your life and seamlessly become a part of your daily routine. They took a walkman and turned it into a small rectangle that could hold thousands of songs. From there, they decided to have to tote around both an iPod and a phone was too inconvenient; thus the iPhone was born. They took their famed Macbook and decided maybe it was too bulky for someone always on the go and gave us the option to start using the iPad as a lighter alternative. We’re all a part of the Apple community because they’re making products with the everyday person in mind. They are at the forefront of innovation, releasing new technology before we even ask for it.

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The tech industry giant has even become one of the highest-selling watchmakers in the world, they even outsold the entire Swiss Watch industry in 2017. There’s an Apple product for nearly every piece of technology, guaranteeing compatibility between devices, so why not just become loyal to them? Thanks to customer loyalty, Apple doesn’t need to drop millions of dollars on advertising; every one of their customers is a walking advertisement. Unique marketing strategies are game changers in the industry, and luckily at EMB, they’re our specialty.






Does my Brand Need an Influencer?

To answer the title question, no, your brand does not necessarily “need” an influencer. There are multiple ways in which your brand can gain traction through the use of digital marketing agencies and things alike. However, it would be a disservice to you as a brand owner to neglect to shed light on what GoogleTrends and Forbes have reported as being the “fastest growing sector of digital marketing.” Although this post may not provide an exhaustive list of considerations regarding joining the trend of influencer marketing, it will offer you a better understanding of what an influencer is and how they can help your brand.

What Is an Influencer?

The short and sweet definition of an influencer is: A person who uses social media really well, gets a lot of likes, and influences people like you and me to buy the products or services they are using. Perhaps you already have a social media account on which you follow people who are always on trend, continually trying new things and encouraging you to do the same, or just seem to have a lot of engagement on what they post. If so, you have successfully been exposed to the world of influencer marketing, and it happened without you even realizing. Don’t be alarmed, this is good. It shows that the influencer has done such a phenomenal job of sharing their testimony of products, and building a relationship with you through their transparency that you actually have gained a sense of trust for an individual you may have never even met! See the beauty yet?

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How Can My Brand Benefit from Having an Influencer?

To determine if an influencer can be beneficial to your brand, we must first determine what exactly they do. The short and easy definition we provided you with earlier in the post has probably incorrectly caused you to assume that influencers are merely people posting pictures on social media. This thought couldn’t be further from the truth. Influencers are essentially the equivalent of a recommendation from your best friend! Now, just imagine that this recommendation is being made to 5,000+ best friends, and further, the suggestion is your brand or business! (If your best friend has lousy recommendations, then this isn’t a helpful analogy).

As a brand, one of your main goals is not only to reach the masses, but to create an entity to which people relate and with which they feel comfortable spending their hard earned money. As with the vast majority of marketing options, influencers come with a price tag, so before you make the investment, let’s take a look at the ways influencers can be beneficial. For starters, influencers are less annoying, and as a result, do not fall subject to the powerful pop-up blocker (can you believe 47 percent of online consumers use pop-up blockers?). This means, more people get to see what you have to offer, and most importantly, they are actually enjoying it. When information is presented in a more authentic way, as with showing someone’s favorite Instagrammer indulging in your product, people tend to have a better reaction, which leads to better conversion rates going forward.

Not only are the influencers helpful in presenting your product or service most organically, but they also put you in a better position to gain a cult of supporters. This holds true when statistics reveal customers acquired via word-of-mouth have a 37 percent higher retention rate. Another great way that an influencer can benefit your brand is by possibly saving you a few coins on the front end and yielding almost twice the reward of what your paid advertisements have provided you. Ultimately, influencers can work to bring your brand increased website traffic, create a sense of authenticity, and keep your brand at the forefront of the minds of your consumers without being a pest, and all for a fraction of the cost of paid advertisements.

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As with the many decisions you must make as a brand owner, the decision to hire an influencer isn’t one you want to make before you do your research on them and your desired target audience. Finding an influencer will require trial and error just like your previous marketing efforts, and will bring a new character to your brand’s story. The potential rewards that come from hiring an influencer are evident, but always remember that you are the captain of your ship and what works for one company may not be what works for you.

At Enrich My Brand, we are dedicated to helping brands like you discover what their next marketing move should be. If you would like to learn more about implementing an influencer marketing campaign for your brand, we highly recommend using our friends and partners at Ifluenz. Ask us how we can help you set up and manage an influencer marketing campaign of your own.











What We Can All Learn From Nike

Just Do It.

A slogan familiar to us all over the years has repositioned itself in the hearts of many Americans as of late. Earlier this week, Nike released a new ad campaign for the 30th anniversary of its famous three words in what some are considering the most controversial way possible. NFL player Colin Kaepernick is up close and personal with the masses in the new photo for the ad campaign, featuring a black and white headshot of Kaepernick with the words “Believe in something. Even if it means sacrificing everything.” A powerful statement from a public figure, and a bold move from a sports retail giant. Many small, up and coming, and personal brands may shy away from mirroring the footsteps of Nike, but perhaps, after the smoke has cleared, there is a lesson available to us all.

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When you’re one of the most popular athletic brands in the world, losing an audience member or a few thousand is not the end of the world.

The Nike ad campaign is a perfect example of how controversy can be used to help your brand stand out amongst the crowd. Sure, Nike has been a household name for decades, but now Nike is being admired for taking a stance on a sensitive topic. By taking into consideration the political climate of our country today, Nike has been able to use it to propel itself to new heights. The retail giant has always been an all-inclusive brand, and all things considered, this step to choose a side required a severe risk-reward assessment. Clearly, Nike made the right move as their stocks have risen to $83.47, an all-time high for the company. What does this teach us? Don’t break a sweat searching for the next hot political topic to get people and their emotions involved in your brand, but instead, take note of the fact that emotions sell, people like to feel, and if you can connect with their feelings, you win their hearts and continued support.

There are times when it is appropriate to share your values on an issue.

As a brand owner, often times there is the underlying notion of keeping your political views private. It is no secret that Colin Kaepernick has taken a stance in the face of what he and many other Americans have experienced to be social injustice. The question then becomes, when is it acceptable to share your semi-unpopular opinion? In Nike’s case, the company approaching the 30-year anniversary of their famous slogan was the perfect opportunity to hone in on the fact that 91 percent of millennials will switch brands because they support a specific cause. Nike, in a sense, has given its stamp of approval to Kaepernick and single-handedly polarized what seems to be an entire nation concerning who will #StandWithKap or who will #BurnNike. Using morality in marketing is far from a new technique, but understanding the importance of researching market trends is what will allow you the time to assess the risks of voicing your opinion and prepare your brand for the initial backlash you may endure. Not every company or brand is in a position to take such a stand, or just may not be interested in doing so; what is most important is that before you choose to act, be sure it is for something you believe in wholeheartedly.

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Going forward, what are some ways that your brand can take advantage of the social climate our nation is in today? What are some issues that drive you, and are perhaps the pillars of what your brand stands on? Would you rather have a large audience that is seemingly disconnected or do you prefer to have an audience that shares your values and ultimately will band together to ensure your longevity? And the ultimate question, when was the last time you and your colleagues discussed a Nike ad until today? It looks like they may be on to something!

As for us at EMB, we’ll choose to hold onto our Nikes and Converse while we dream crazy.